Refugee crisis

Discussion in 'Off Topic International' started by -frog-, Mar 11, 2022.

  1. -frog-

    -frog- Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, how are your countries coping with the refugee crisis?
    We've got a lot o people incoming, but still, strained as the system is, it seems to still be able to cope with it.
    My daughter used to be part of rather unpopular class (specializing in maths) in her primary school - while other classes had 28-30 pupils, her only had 24... until now. The first Ukrainian pupil showed up on Tuesday, now there are 5 in her class.

    We accepted some 1.5M Ukrainians to date, and the tendency is growing, still there are no reports of any disturbances in getting them shelter and what they require and need.

    Anyone from the Republic of Macedonia?
    You've, according to reports, accepted the most refugees per capita.
    I knew a few people from Macedonia, and they're hospitable as we are, but the situation there might look a bit worse I guess (taking the relative numbers into account).
     
  2. OldUncles

    OldUncles Well-Known Member

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    Poland deserves a lot of praise for helping Ukrainian refugees. It's amazing that some of the children are already showing up in schools, really. As opposed to being housed in tents in a convenient potato field or parking lot, which is what often happens with a NATO response to a refugee crisis.
     
  3. mcgru-

    mcgru- Well-Known Member

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    Send ukrainian refugees to Kosovo - the population's balance (albanians vs serbs/ukrainians) should return back to 50/50 at least.
     
  4. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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    About a quarter of those who entered Romania are staying, it seems. Others are going to other destinations.
    Some are staying with Romanian families, some in hotels, maybe other forms of accomodation too.
    Law came out enabling the kids to learn in Romanian schools and Ukrainian teachers, if there are among the refugees, to be hired by schools.
    Unlike Poland, there's the language barrier here. I'm don't see how the problem will be solved if there aren't sufficient Ukrainian teachers.
    Still, even without sufficient teachers, there must be some form of integration.
    A lot of organisations and help groups emerged now, much more humane and competent than the state, right from the start. A lot of people sent food, clothes, to such an extent that these groups started to appeal to stop the sending of stuff, because they were flooded with it and it became a logistical problem.
     
  5. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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    Here, people cannot be "sent".
     
  6. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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    This isn't a NATO response. It's mostly neighbors' and EU's.
    The brit govt are a bunch of wankers.

    [edit]
    In fact it's a world effort now, I see Guatemala is receiving some Ukrainian refugees.
    It's the world trying to clean Putin's mess.

    Brit govt are still a bunch of wankers.
    [\edit]

    Your guy, uncles, I know he's unpopular. But they've done great in all this mess.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2022
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  7. jfm

    jfm Well-Known Member

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    Maybe numbers are about all refugees since 2015, not Ukrainians since february?.

    Anyway, they own refugee camps overcrowded then, and almost empty now.
     
  8. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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  9. mcgru-

    mcgru- Well-Known Member

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    When refugees are "directed" (distributed, propagated) to some other regions of EU - it is the same as "sent".
    Many words - one meaning.
    Even if you do not pay dotations/compensations/help "here" but pay "there" - it is also has the "send" effect.
     
  10. jfm

    jfm Well-Known Member

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    Moldova =/= Macedonia ;)
     
  11. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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    No, it's not. They are not directed or propagated. They are offered accomodation and rights.
    Stop rationalising every single idiocy. We get it it's not yours, but a socially learned way of thinking things. We've been through it as a society. Keep calm and await the enlightenment.
     
  12. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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    If it's about Moldova, they've asked for support. Romania's helping them (both govt and NGO's), EU is helping them, US has promised support too. Still, it's terribly hard for them.
    About 100k are staying in Moldova, the govt wants to provide financial help to families hosting refugees.
     
  13. mcgru-

    mcgru- Well-Known Member

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    Say that "no" for distribution of refugees from Africa/East among countries such as Hungary and Poland - mostly all refugees wanted to stay at Germany and go to GB due to their higher quality of life, nobody wanted to go Hungary and Romania, but EU dispatched additional financial aid to those refugees who agreed to stay in low-cost countries.
     
  14. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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    It's incentives. Morally ambiguous, indeed.
    Still, not the "sending" that you first had in mind.
    To be clear, african or middle eastern refugees here have been badly treated in many cases. Both by govts and by people. But there are laws that punish this kind of things and civil societies that act on it. Politicians here don't have that kind of power your Putin has, to just send people away. That's the difference. Even the fact that you can't admit the deficiencies in you govt is a sign that you're living in a authoritarian regime. You rarely find such stance here, really.
     
  15. -frog-

    -frog- Well-Known Member

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    My bad :)

    The former were not refugees, but "tourists" invited to Belarus by Mr. Lukashenko, and granted Belarusian tourist visas.
    According to all international conventions in place, they should have sought refugee in the first country that was not at war during their trip.
    So Dubai or Qatar for most of them, cuase most of them had their connection flights at DXB or DOH.

    And even if I do believe that they were grossly mistreated by our government, the one responsible for their misery is the one who invited these "tourists" to Belarus.

    Apart from that they presented rather uncommon profile of refugees.
    Over half of them were young males in conscription age, ones that would make good homeland defenders, if they were really threatened with war.
    Ukrainian refugees are almost exclusively women with children and elderly.
    Our MoFA estimates that some 120 thousand male Ukrainians have crossed the Polish-Ukrainian border... but not to get to Poland, but to get back to Ukraine and fight.
     
  16. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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    I assumed it's easy for Ukrainians to understand Polish. Is that right?
     
  17. -frog-

    -frog- Well-Known Member

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    I guess it would be easier for them to understand Russian :)
    But yes, the languages bear some similarities.

    Ukrainian is closer to Russian in terms of grammar, sentence structure, and (of course) alphabet (albeit Ukrainian has some significant differences - e.g. with notation of the "i" letter, which is Latin in Ukrainian, and Cyrillic in Russian).
    Ukrainian is something "inbetween" when it comes to the lexical layer thereof (I guess, in general, there are more words that resemble Polish than those that resemble Russian).
    There is a vast number of words that it shares with Russian, and also a great number of words, that are sourced from Polish (but not necessarily pronounced as they are in their original languages).

    So I guess Ukrainians would have no problem understanding Russian (even if they were under 35, and from western Ukraine, which means that they could have never learned Russian), but writing/speaking it would already be of an issue for those, who never learned it.
    When Polish is considered - that's rather a "word catching game" - Ukrainians can make some/even a lot of sense of Polish, by understanding just some words (same as I did with Ukrainian, when I first came in touch with it, while I was still studying at the University), but there's almost no chance they will produce a correct sentence without learning first.
     
  18. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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    The public TV channels here will start broadcasting the programmes of Ukrainan TV channels (both public and private), daily during certain hours in the evening.
     
  19. rgreat

    rgreat FH Developer

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    I guess your masters decided that you need even more brainwashing.
    As if current level was not quite enough. :fly2:
     
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  20. vasco

    vasco Well-Known Member

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    So now you are critical of refugees getting content from home in their own language, or what?

    Is that dying monster still feeding you its rectal mucus? Does it have any power left? I wonder for how long, for I've heard it has started eating the minions.